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Basic Round Ripple Afghan Pattern


This is a stash buster.  

This is the most basic type of instructions for creating the 12 point Round Ripple Afghan.  All the Round Ripple Afghans on my Blog can be created using this one basic pattern if you apply the "Afghan Schematics" that are found on the Photo Page of each afghan

If you are new to this style afghan please read my page
Tips and Tricks of the Round Ripple Afghan.
http://idealdelusions.blogspot.com/p/tips-and-tricks-of-round-ripple-afghan.html

For Afghan Schematics
Start here using the materials and additional stitch descriptions listed with the afghan you have chosen.

Basic Pattern stitch description 

Even shell = (dc, ch 2, dc) in two chain space of each point
Increase shell = (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in two chain space of each point

Pattern: Start with a loop "magic circle" or Ch 4 join

Round 1: Ch 2, counts as first dc throughout pattern, work 11 dc in ring, join with sl st in top of ch 2 throughout pattern. (12 dc)

Round 2: Ch 2, dc in same st, 2 dc in each dc around, join (24 dc)

Round 3: Ch 2, (*skip next dc, work dc, ch 2, dc in next dc.) Even shell made. Repeat from * around, ending with dc in base of beginning stitch, ch 2, join sl st in top of ch 2. (12 even shells)

Round 4: Sl st into ch 2 space and *ch 2, (*counts as first dc), (dc, ch 2, 2 dc) all in same space, in next ch 2 space work (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) "increase shell made"  work 1 increase shell in each ch 2 space, around. Join. (12 increase shells)

Round 5: Sl st into next st, ch 2, (*work increase shell in ch 2 space, dc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, dc in next st.) Repeat from * around, sk two sts, join to top of ch 2. Each point should now have 1 dc, an increase shell, 1 dc for a total of 6 dc.

Round 6: Sl st into next st, ch 2, dc in next st, (*work "even shell" in ch 2 space, dc in each of next 2 dc, skip the next 2 sts, dc in each of next 2 dc.) Repeat from * around, ending with skip 2 sts. Join to top of ch 2. Each point now has 2 dc, an even shell, 2 dc for a total of 6 stitches (3 on each side)

Round 7: Sl st into next st, Ch 2, dc in next st, * work increase shell in next ch 2 space, dc in next 2 sts, skip 2 sts, dc in next 2 sts. Repeat from * around, ending with skip 2 sts. Join. Each point now has 2dc, an increase shell, 2 dc for a total of 8 stitches. 4 dc on each side of ch 2 point.

Round 8: Sl st into next st, ch 2, dc in next 2 sts, * work increase shell in ch 2 space, dc in next 3 sts, skip next 2 sts, dc in the next 3 sts. Repeat from * around, ending with skip 2 sts. Join. Each point now has 3 dc, an increase shell, 3 dc for a total of 10 stitches or 5 dc on each side of ch 2 point or total 10 sts.


Round 9: Sl st into next st, ch 2, dc in next 3 sts, * work even shell in ch 2 space, dc in next 4 sts, skip next 2 sts, dc in next 4 sts. Repeat from * around, ending with skip 2 sts. Join.

Round 10: Sl st into next st, ch 2, dc in next 3 sts, * work increase shell in ch 2 space, dc in next 4 sts, skip next 2 sts, dc in next 4 sts. Repeat from * around, ending with skip 2 sts. Join.

Round 11: Sl st into next st, ch 2, dc in next 4 sts, * work increase shell in ch 2 space, dc in next 5 sts, skip next 2 sts, dc in next 5 sts. Repeat from * around, ending with skip 2 sts. Join.

Round 12: Sl st into next st, ch 2, dc in next 5 sts, * work even shell in ch 2 space, dc in next 6 sts, skip next 2 sts, dc in next 6 sts. Repeat from * around, ending with skip 2 sts. Join,

Continue working in rounds in pattern as established, always working 1 round with even shells followed by 2 rounds with increase shells. As you continue repeating rounds the number of dc will increase 24 stitches (2 stitches each point) on every increase round until the desired size of afghan is accomplished.

For Stash-busters
When you design your own Stash-buster, the yarn weight, your tension and hook size determine the stitch gauge and the number of rounds needed to accomplish an afghan in the size you desire. The color selections and stitch patterns selected for each round are your choice to help you create a personally designed afghan. 50 to 60 inches in diameter or larger

NOTE
If buying new yarn: four 7oz skeins of Red Heart Super Saver makes a lovely personal size afghan.

Materials to design your own Stash-buster:
Basic Round Ripple Afghan pattern (this page)
About 30 to 35 ounces of Worsted Weight yarn
(Baby Yarn can be used but it will make a smaller afghan)
Susan Bates Hook size 5.50  US size 9 / I - UK size 5

To create a Stash Buster Afghan such as in the photos on this page: gather about 30 to 35 ounces of worsted weigh yarn which is more than you need but since the endurance of the individual yarn balls are unreliable some may have to be abandoned as too small.  Weigh each yarn ball and number it as you will be starting with the smallest and progressing to larger yarn balls as each prior color runs out..

The largest amount will be your base color and you may even wish to use a full skein as a base color.  The smallest amount will be used to start the center using progressively larger balls as the afghan expands.  As your work progresses, remember to work in a row or two of your base color to pull it all together.

Any stitch I have used on the side to side ripple pattern I have used on the round ripple.  Using the basic pattern, change colors and / or stitch patterns on the rounds to suite your taste. The amount of rounds you can complete with each ball will vary in accordance with the amount of yarn; your stitch pattern, your tension and which round you are working on as the rounds expand.

Note:  When using those little balls remember what may not be long enough for a double crochet row may still be enough to complete a single crochet row which can be inserted from time to time for effect.

Finished already?  Congratulations you have created a designer afghan.


What happens if you tie all your scrap yarn 
together into one big ball ?
RAG TAG ROUND RIPPLE

38 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you. Try one for yourself. It is really easier than it looks.

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  2. Thank you for posting this pattern, and instructions for a stash-buster afghan. I have always wanted to try a round ripple. I found your pattern very easy to understand, so I've started one with a bunch of Christmas yarn I had stashed away. It's really fun and easy! I love working in rounds rather than rows. For some reason it seems to go faster. :)

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    1. Yes, the centers go very, very fast but the rounds take longer to complete as the afghan grows and can get tedious so I try to keep labor intensive patterns and stitches more to the center of the afghan. I just keep reminding myself one round equals 2 rows if I were working from sided to side. What I like best is you can stop at any point you feel is large enough. Also you can add to it at any time more yarn is available.

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  3. Thank you for your beautiful patterns. I have been copying and pasting for almost two hours into my crochet file. My son has two daughters which regularly receive "special" gifts from Grandmommy. I now have new projects, thanks to you, to surprise them with in the future months.

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    1. You may notice a print button in the sidebar. With most computers it will allow you a choice of Print, Email or Save (an Adobe Reader PDF file) of your choice of pattern. That is why I only post one pattern per page so you will be sure to get the one you want. Some patterns also have a print selection button at the bottom of the page. If it works for you it might make it easier to save. I am delighted you liked my patterns and you will be making them for your special someone's. I have ladies of all ages in my family and I find the giggles and smiles most rewarding. Sharing is so much fun.

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  4. your colors are so pretty! round ripples are the neatest!

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  5. I love Round Ripples, they are so much fun. Thank you

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  6. maybe I have not read far enough or not thought about this long enough but how can I make this a 24 point. I would like to get less extreme points and valley's so I can make a larger afghan

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    1. You would have two options. One would be to make a larger starting circle in the center and instead of establishing 12 points, set up for 24.
      But the best way would be to do a web search for “free crochet pattern, 24 point, round ripple”
      Thank you for your comment

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  7. This pattern is wonderful! I made one in zebra print and black (RHSS) and now I am doing another one in yellow, pink and white. Thank you very much for a pattern that is super easy to follow, at least it is for me.

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  8. I am very happy you like the pattern and it worked out well for you. I am delighted you took the time to let me know. You made my day.
    Thanks for your comment
    Dorie

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  9. I have another comment to make: the best part about this pattern is that I don't have to fight with it to lay flat. I have made round ripple afghans but they did not lay flat like yours. Thank you again for this pattern.

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    1. When I create a pattern I make more than one example before I post it. That way if a problem should pop up I have worked with it and resolved the issues. I lost count on how many of these round ripple afghans I have made years ago.
      I don’t care how “good” anybody is, we have all suffered the “agony of defeat” at some point in time. Many years ago when I developed this pattern I was actually trying to create an oval ripple, with miserable results, so I finally gave up, followed the path of least resistance and went with round.
      I do currently have an oval ripple pattern but have never fully resolved the issues. If I do I may post that also but before I do, I will make sure it is do-able. That is why I post my patterns with so many photos. I don’t want anyone to be disappointed.
      Thanks again Dorie

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  10. Thank you for the pattern,
    I had to write 'my' story about it :)
    http://www.marthas-world.com/CrochetedSunshineRipple

    best regards,
    Martha

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    1. Martha, I could not wait to see your afghan. I love it. Everyone should check out your link. Smashing colors and great story about the misadventure thereof. Oh how many times I have messed up because of my rush to get right into it. Funny an impatient person like myself can even concentrate on sometimes tedious work because, with me, Begun is synonymous with Done. I figure by now I am Queen of Frogging. If I were to give one word of crochet advise to anyone it would be read the pattern first, then no matter how much you hate it count, count, count. With the round ripple I advise don’t try to count the round as a whole, count point by point.
      Here I may also note there is a tips and tricks page on this blog for the round ripple afghan http://idealdelusions.blogspot.com/p/tips-and-tricks-of-round-ripple-afghan.html You see I have had a few misadventures of my own. Thank you so much for your comment. Dorie

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  11. Lovely pattern! I have had it on my (long) to do list for a while, but it's inching it's way up the line. This pattern plus your blog on tips to make a round afghan are a blessing. Thank you so much for sharing your time & talent Doris. :)
    Happy hooking,
    Mary

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    Replies
    1. I am so glad you like this pattern. It really is not that hard to do unless you start getting into the fancy stitches and that does take a little planning but well worth it. You will be amazed at how fast the center grows and it is a pattern that finished before it gets boring. Thanks for you comments. Love hearing from you

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  12. Thanks for the great pattern!!! This is my 'go to' pattern! I make afghans and donate them to our local Children's Hospital and this one works up great for the kids. They seem to love this style as much as I do!! As an added plus, the children get to take their 'blankies' home with them!! My 12 year old granddaughter still gets her afghan that she got as an infant when she is ill. A great way to use up partial skeins of yarn!!

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    1. Sorry I did not respond sooner. I was away from my desk for several days. I am so happy you are enjoying the pattern. This is one of my Go To patterns also. They work up fast and seem to be popular. I like the fact you can stop any time you feel they are big enough. They are great stash busters and no two are alike. Thank you so much for your comment.
      Dorie

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  13. I love this pattern but I have a question...how do you keep everything flat as you go. It seems that every time I crochet something round it starts to ripple the bigger it gets.

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    1. To keep a round afghan flat requires a series of strategically placed extra stitches to allow the project to lay flat by increasing the number of stitches in the rounds evenly. Care must be given not to add too many at once or the project may ripple.
      In the case of the round ripple afghan posted here, those extra stitches are placed in the points of the rounds so they become a part of the design. After the center setup is formed the afghan is merely a three round repeat till the final round is attained.
      Example: When beginning the repeat rounds,
      Round 1 has (dc, ch 2, dc) in the center of each point
      Round 2 has (2dc, chain 2, 2dc) in each point. (24 extra stitches – 2 in each point)
      Round 3 has (2dc, chain 2, 2dc) in each point. (24 extra stitches – 2 in each point)
      second set of repeat rounds
      Same as Round 1 has (dc, ch 2, dc) in the center of each point (no increase in stitches from the last round)
      Next two rounds will have increase stitches.

      I hope this helped and I have posted a page that helps explain the logic of the round ripple afghan.
      I thought it would be helpful to those who are not familiar with how the round ripple verses the side to side ripple afghans.

      http://idealdelusions.blogspot.com/p/tips-and-tricks-of-round-ripple-afghan.html

      Thank you for your comment and question.

      Dorie

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  14. I work the overnight shift as a relay operator for the deaf. Usually after midnight things start to really slow down, and I'm always looking for things to do to occupy myself. After spending the weekend doing a sample of this, I can't wait to go through my stash tomorrow to find some good colors to start this during my shift tomorrow night. I've gotten more blankets done during this shift! Love it!

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  15. I am delighted you like it. You may be surprised at how quickly it grows. I like it because you can make it any size you like. Many have told me it is a fun project. I know it is one of my favorites. Thank you for your comment. Dorie

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  16. Love your designs! I used your ideas for two of mine as models - They came out great!! The one, I ended up making into a big sunflower for my daughter-in-law with 3-D petals by working a few rounds in back row only.

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    1. What a wonderful idea. I know that is amazing. I am sure she loved it. I have often put flowers on mine but never made one into a flower. I would love to see it, did you post a photo anywhere? Please share the link if you can. Thank you for sharing. Dorie

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  17. I am learning to read patterns. When you say work next DC in row 3 what do you mean?

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    1. I am not sure where/what you are reading but as a general rule if the directions say "work next DC" if working in DC you would DC in the next DC stitch. For a more detailed explanation go to the EMAIL ME app in the right sidebar, this will send and enail directly to me on my personal address. Send me your email address (nobody else will see it, and ask me your questions. I will be happy to help and respond directly to your private email.

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  18. Still love this pattern. I've been making baby blankets for a local NICU. Thank you so very much!!! Dianne

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    1. Thank you for your positive comment and for sharing with others. This is what I hoped my blog would achieve. Today you made my heart smile.

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  19. Thank you for your easily to understand pattern. I have made one (which turned out beautiful ) and am now going to start a second one (this one a baby afghan) in variegated blues. I can't wait to see how it will turn out!

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    1. Thank you for your comment. Due to its versatility I love this pattern myself and still make at least one a month. More recently I tied all my leftover scrap yarn ends together and wound them into a huge ball. Then I stated a round ripple afghan I pre named “Rags”. As yarn becomes available I add on to it and it is now approaching serviceable size. I am, perhaps one of the few, that find a unique amount of beauty in “functional”. I have not yet decided if I will post a photo or not but it is most unusual. I am glad you are enjoying the pattern. Sharing gives me a lot of pleasure.

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    2. I have made many of these from baby size to 6' and found them easy. My next project will try the 24 point one

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    3. Thank you for taking time to comment. Let me know how you make out on the 24 points. I have not yet gone beyond 16 points

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  20. Thanks for sharing this pattern.
    Should round 8 begin with Sl st into next stitch? (like the previous and following rounds). At the moment is just says St into next stitch.
    I've only been crocheting a few months and don't want to make a mistake.

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    1. Thank you for your correction. This pattern has been up for many years with an occasional tweak or addition here and there. I have no idea when that error occured. You are the first to mention it to me and I have corrected it.
      Thank you for your visit to Ideal Delusion. I am always delighted when someone comments. I am especially glad to see a beginner as I try to make my patterns as easy to understand as possible. Self taught 60 years ago, I struggled with no help until the internet and am now in awe with variety of patterns and ideas. With your attention to detail I expect you are going to rapidly become an accomplished artisan. You are the first to make me smile today. Thank you. Dorie

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    2. You’re welcome. Thanks for responding so quickly! I too am in awe of what’s available now via the internet and have spent many hours looking at the wonderful things people produce and design from scratch. One thing I have noticed – as a beginner – is that there are a lot of mistakes in published patterns but it seems experienced crocheters just work around them or know that they are mistakes and figure out the correct thing to do without bothering to comment. For a beginner though, even the smallest mistake can mean your project comes to a complete standstill.

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    3. Good question. Many patterns seem to have mistakes, but sometimes not, sometimes it is just in the way we, as individuals, interpret the pattern. 60 years ago I decided to teach myself how to crochet. I had a “How to” book with a photo strip tutorial that showed me how to crochet each stitch. Each project had a printed pattern that usually included a photo of the completed project so you knew how it was supposed to look. From that point on you read each step of the pattern and hoped for the best. If you did it wrong you would know when the stitch count was wrong or when you tried to work the next row and it would not fit. If you had nobody to ask when you got stuck, you had to keep trying until you worked it out.

      I learned to read a pattern but I have no degree in how to write a pattern. I have been crocheting for so long I don’t use patterns much. When others want to make the same things I make they ask me to share my patterns. I must admit after so many years of reading patterns I thought writing one would be a snap, trust me, it is not.
      To create a pattern I try to write in the manner of the accepted standardized crochet patterns. But with an international blog I have another problem, the language barrier. So then came the pictures. Sort of an answer to the question “I wonder if I am doing this right” I strive to write a cohesive pattern that everyone can understand.
      But when you crochet for a long time you develop your own style. (You will too) So what I write may be perfectly clear to me but for others maybe not not so much.
      To this very day I find patterns I can easily understand and others that don’t make sense to me.
      I want everyone to be happy with their projects so I allow the comments on my blog and I placed the email app for any/all who have questions or suggestions. I have gotten to talk to many wonderful persons.

      My very best advice to someone learning to crochet is read the pattern before you start to be sure you understand all the directions and always remember counting is important. Always count every row/round. (For ease in counting the round ripple, count point by point.)
      Remember if you don’t have time to count as you go, you sure don’t have time to tear it out and do it over.
      Best of luck to you.
      Thank you for your comment. There is an “Email Me” App in the sidebar if you need more assistance with the directions.
      Dorie

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